Beverages

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Taste of summer
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There are plenty of good beverages in Russia. They include the legendary vodka, infusions, medovukha, and different wines. Good nonalcoholic beverages include such original Russian drinks as kvass, fruit drinks and kompots from cranberries, cloudberries, blueberries, raspberries and other berries.

And forgive me, but I can’t leave pickled cucumbers’ brine unmentioned. Yes, people drink it. Obviously, in special situations.  This beverage works miracles the morning after Russian holiday feasts.

But the most important beverage, most common on the Russian table, is, obviously… tea. It can be green, black, a traditional herbal

infusion, or rosebay. Russians like having tea and can sit down to drink “some tea” up to five or six times a day. Nowadays the tea is infused in an infuser teapot and hot water is added from an electric kettle. In the old days, the water was boiled in samovars. It made the tea exceptionally tasty. In the village of Dagomys and surrounding area near Sochi, Russian tea is grown. Strange as it may seem, it is rather good.

As for coffee, this emerged later, in tsarist Russia, but has gained a great number of devotees. So Russians consume coffee with great pleasure as well, especially in the morning before leaving for work.
Nowadays, besides Russian and local ethnic cuisine restaurants, in most Russian cities there are fast food joints; Japanese, Chinese and Indian restaurants; Italian pizza places, Irish pubs and nano cafes. Russians like to try new things, and that is why these restaurants and cafes are always in demand.


Nowadays, besides Russian and local ethnic cuisine restaurants, in most Russian cities there are fast food joints; Japanese, Chinese and Indian restaurants; Italian pizza places, Irish pubs and nano cafes. Russians like to try new things, and that is why these restaurants and cafes are always in demand.

Come to Russia, remember every corner of our country not only visually, but also by its taste and flavor. Will it be the sweetish savor of bear’s meat, or dizzying flavor of shashlik? The natural sweetness of chek-chek and Tula gingerbread, or salty taste of black caviar? This is for you to decide. 


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